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IAUC 2846: N Mon 1975 (= A0620-00); N Cyg 1975; 1975h; 1975g; 1975i; Sats OF JUPITER

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                                                  Circular No. 2846
Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams
INTERNATIONAL ASTRONOMICAL UNION
Postal Address: Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
Cable Address: SATELLITES, NEWYORK
Western Union: RAPID SATELLITE CAMBMASS


NOVA MONOCEROTIS 1975 (= A0620-00)
     D. Ya. Martynov, Sternberg Astronomical Institute, reports:
"During a 20-min interval on Sept. 10.9 UT Sheffer and Moskalenko
observed this source with the x-ray telescope on board the Salyut-4
space station.  The ratios of the fluxes from this source to that
of Sco X-1 (observed on July 5) were as follows: 0.2-0.6 keV, 2.26;
0.6-0.9, 6.01; 0.9-2, 4.1; 2-3.5, 2.1; 3.5-6, 6.0; 6-10, 10.45.
Estimation from the spectral shape in the soft region gives the
total amount of hydrogen in the line of sight to A0620-00 as 10**21
to 10**22 atoms; the distance is thus not larger than to Sco X-1."

     J. Bortle, Brooks Observatory, provides the following visual
magnitude estimates: Sept. 29.4 UT, 11.8; 30.3, 11.9.

     Corrigendum.  On IAUC 2830, the last sentence should read:
"B-V values ranged between +0.05 and +0.20."


NOVA CYGNI 1975
     D. H. Beattie, T. J. Lee and P. M. Williams, Royal Observatory,
Edinburgh, communicate the following infrared observations,
made with the 152-cm flux collector on Tenerife: Sept. 13.9 UT,
H = 4.81, K = 4.38, L' = 3.20; 16.9, 4.98, 4.42, 2.93; 18.9, 5.27,
4.65, 3.26.  (The L' filter is at 3.8 um; its width 1 um.)

     Further selected recent visual magnitude estimates: Sept.
25.05 UT, 7.4 (C. Sherrod, North Little Rock, Arkansas); 26.94, 7.4
(N. A. v.d. Mey, Soesterberg, The Netherlands); 29.1, 7.5 (J.
Bortle, Brooks Observatory); 30.1, 7.8 (Bortle); Oct. 1.08, 7.8
(Sherrod); 2.08, 7.6 (P. Maley, Houston, Texas); 3.12, 7.6 (Maley);
4.08, 7.7 (Maley); 5.08, 7.8 (Maley); 6.05, 7.8 (Maley).

     Corrigendum.  On IAUC 2827, the Wise Observatory observations
were made by I. Kupo on Aug. 30.9 UT.


COMET KOBAYASHI-BERGER-MILON (1975h)
     The following precise positions have been reported:

     1975 UT             R. A. (1950) Decl.        m1    Observer
     July 30.06968    14 31 05.91   +57 51 04.7          Codina
          30.08912    14 30 40.06   +57 49 59.6            "
     Sept.13.17182    10 33 53.42   +18 56 16.5    6.0   Milet
          18.17565    10 29 42.04   +12 59 13.6    6.5     "
          18.17842    10 29 41.93   +12 58 59.0            "
          30.17752    10 27 58.39   - 0 35 49.1            "
          30.18203    10 27 58.49   - 0 36 02.4    7.0     "

J. M. Codina (Fabra Observatory, Barcelona).  Computer: N. Torras.
B. Milet (Nice Observatory).

     The following selected total visual magnitude estimates have
been reported: Sept. 29.40 UT, 6.4 (J. Bortle, Brooks Observatory,
10 x 50 binoculars); 30.46, 7.5 (P. Maley, Houston, Texas, 13-cm
f/5 refractor); Oct. 3.46, 7.4 (Maley); 4.40, 6.9 (Bortle); 5.46,
7.3 (Maley; faint tail 0o.8 long in p.a. 300o); 6.47, 7.4 (Maley).


PERIODIC COMET LONGMORE (1975g)
     R. M. West, European Southern Observatory, communicates the
following precise positions, obtained with the 100-cm Schmidt:

     1975 UT             R. A. (1950) Decl.        m1
     Aug. 11.09354    17 53 51.75   -56 03 29.8   ]20
          11.20573    17 53 51.27   -56 02 30.4


PERIODIC COMET CHURYUMOV-GERASIMENKO (1975i)
     E. Roemer, University of Arizona, provides the following precise
position, obtained with the Steward Observatory's 229-cm reflector.
R. A. McCallister assisted.  Measurer: C. C. McCarthy.

     1975 UT             R. A. (1950) Decl.
     Sept. 9.23877    20 16 43.65   -30 22 59.5


SATELLITES OF JUPITER
     On the recommendation of the Working Group for Planetary System
Nomenclature, the IAU Executive Committee has approved the
following names for the satellites of Jupiter: satellite V = Amalthea,
VI = Himalia, VII = Elara, VIII = Pasiphae, IX = Sinope, X = Lysithea,
XI = Carme, XII = Ananke, XIII = Leda.  The name for satellite
V, suggested by C. Flammarion, has been in unofficial use for
many decades; that for satellite XIII was proposed by the discoverer,
C. Kowal.  The names for satellites VI-XIII are in accord with
a suggestion by J. Blunck that the distant satellites with direct
orbits should have names ending in a and those with retrograde orbits
names ending in e.  The resolution will be submitted to the
XVIth IAU General Assembly in Grenoble in Aug. 1976 for acceptance.


1975 October 7                 (2846)              Brian G. Marsden

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